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19 th century stories
The first Jews of Dorsten
Dorsten 1820: "Violence in
the synagogue itself"
Eisendrath Family in Dorsten
The family name
Julia Eisendrath - portrait of
a Jewish Mama
Eulogy at the grave of
Julia Eisendrath
Jewish real property in Dorsten
Nathan Eisendrath emigrates
David Samson Eisendrath
Establishing in the USA
Migration of Jews from Europe
to North America
20 th century stories
Visits to Europe since the 1920s
1933: A Protest Letter to
President Hindenburg (1933)
The Letter in full text
The Eisendrath branch in Zaandam/Netherlands
The last jewish place in Dorsten
Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath
Charles R. Eisendrath: An
identity and family history that
are inextricably linked (1999)
21 st century stories
Adam Eisendrath: The German Heritage Quest - February 2000
Dorsten contacts and
visits 2001-2007
Family Reunion 2010
The journey of two prayer books
Who and why?
The Dorsten research group
and the Jewish Museum
of Westphalia
 
* The signature in the header above
is that of Samson Nathan Eisendrath
(from the year 1840)
 
 
Who and why?
The Dorsten research group and the Jewish Museum of Westphalia

The contents of these pages are the result of research by the group “Dorsten under the Swastika” – a history workshop of dedicated people who study forgotten aspects of local and regional history since 1982. The group has published several brochures and books on the issues of Nazi history, the “before” and “after” of the Nazi regime and has also produced an exhibition.

Since 1987, the “Verein für jüdische Geschichte und Religion” (Association für Jewish History and Religion) has built up a regional museum: the “Jewish Museum of Westphalia” which opened in 1992. In 2001 an extension was built providing more exhibition space.

Since 1987, the “Verein für jüdische Geschichte und Religion” (Association für Jewish History and Religion) has built up a regional museum: the “Jewish Museum of Westphalia” opened in 1992. Building and expositions have been extended in 2001.

As the descendants of those involved in the extermination of German Jews or were at least responsible as “bystanders” we want to preserve the traces of Jewish history and contribute to understanding of this part of our history and culture. We do not forget the discrimination and mass murders but are also aware of the periods of good relations and mutual enrichment between Jewish and non-Jewish Germans, we encourage both young and old to support tolerance and human rights today.

The “Eisendrath stories” are part of this; they illustrate a living transatlantic link between the origins of the family and many of the present-day members of the family. We are very grateful for the contact many family members still maintain with us today.

Header: The Jewish Museum of Westphalia (2007)

 
   
 

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